Tuesday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time – Tuesday Gospel Homily




Tuesday of the Twenty-seventh Week in Ordinary Time – Tuesday Gospel Homily

Today’s Audio Mass Readings – Lectionary: 462

1st Reading – JON 3:1-10

The word of the LORD came to Jonah a second time:
“Set out for the great city of Nineveh,
and announce to it the message that I will tell you.”
So Jonah made ready and went to Nineveh,
according to the LORD’s bidding.
Now Nineveh was an enormously large city;
it took three days to go through it.
Jonah began his journey through the city,
and had gone but a single day’s walk announcing,
“Forty days more and Nineveh shall be destroyed,”
when the people of Nineveh believed God;
they proclaimed a fast and all of them, great and small,
put on sackcloth.

When the news reached the king of Nineveh,
he rose from his throne, laid aside his robe,
covered himself with sackcloth, and sat in the ashes.
Then he had this proclaimed throughout Nineveh,
by decree of the king and his nobles:
“Neither man nor beast, neither cattle nor sheep,
shall taste anything;
they shall not eat, nor shall they drink water.
Man and beast shall be covered with sackcloth
and call loudly to God;
every man shall turn from his evil way
and from the violence he has in hand.
Who knows, God may relent and forgive,
and withhold his blazing wrath,
so that we shall not perish.”
When God saw by their actions how they turned from their evil way,
he repented of the evil that he had threatened to do to them;
he did not carry it out.

Responsorial Psalm – PS 130:1B-2, 3-4AB, 7-8

R. (3) If you, O Lord, mark iniquities, who can stand?
Out of the depths I cry to you, O LORD
LORD, hear my voice!
Let your ears be attentive
to my voice in supplication.
R. If you, O Lord, mark iniquities, who can stand?
If you, O LORD, mark iniquities,
LORD, who can stand?
But with you is forgiveness,
that you may be revered.
R. If you, O Lord, mark iniquities, who can stand?
Let Israel wait for the LORD,
For with the LORD is kindness
and with him is plenteous redemption;
And he will redeem Israel
from all their iniquities.
R. If you, O Lord, mark iniquities, who can stand?

Alleluia – LK 11:28

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Blessed are those who hear the word of God
and observe it.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

Gospel – LK 10:38-42

Jesus entered a village
where a woman whose name was Martha welcomed him.
She had a sister named Mary
who sat beside the Lord at his feet listening to him speak.
Martha, burdened with much serving, came to him and said,
“Lord, do you not care
that my sister has left me by myself to do the serving?
Tell her to help me.”
The Lord said to her in reply,
“Martha, Martha, you are anxious and worried about many things.
There is need of only one thing.
Mary has chosen the better part
and it will not be taken from her.”

Catholic Daily Reflections

Resting at the Feet of Jesus

Martha, burdened with much serving, came to him and said, “Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me by myself to do the serving? Tell her to help me.” The Lord said to her in reply, “Martha, Martha, you are anxious and worried about many things. There is need of only one thing. Mary has chosen the better part and it will not be taken from her.” Luke 10:40-42

At first this seems unfair. Martha is working hard at preparing the meal, while Mary is just sitting there at the feet of Jesus. So, Martha complains to Jesus. But interestingly, Jesus somewhat humbles Martha instead of Mary. Of course, He does it in a kind and gentle way.

The truth is that both Martha and Mary were fulfilling their unique roles at that moment. Martha was doing Jesus a great service by serving Him through the preparation of their meal. This is what she was called to do and the service would have been an act of love. Mary, on the other hand, was fulfilling her role. She was called, at that moment, to simply sit at the feet of Jesus and be present to Him.

These two women have traditionally represented two vocations in the Church, as well as two callings we are all called to have. Martha represents the active life and Mary represents the contemplative life. The active life is that life most live on a daily basis, be it through the service of family or others in the world. The contemplative life is a vocation to which some are called through the cloistered life, in that they leave the busy world and dedicate most of their day to prayer and solitude.

Truthfully, you are called to both of these vocations. Even if your life is one filled with work, you are still called regularly to choose “the better part.” At times, Jesus calls you to imitate Mary in that He wants you to daily stop your work and dedicate some time to Him and Him alone. Not everyone is able to go spend time before the Blessed Sacrament each day in silent prayer, but some are. However, you should seek to find at least some time of silence and solitude every day so as to sit at the feet of Jesus in prayer.

Reflect, today, upon your own call to prayer. Do you pray? Do you pray every day? If this is lacking, then reflect upon the image of Mary being there at the feet of Jesus and know that Jesus wants the same from you.

Lord, help me to hear You calling me to stop what I’m doing and to simply rest in Your divine presence. May I find those moments every day in which I can be refreshed in Your presence. Jesus, I trust in You.

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